Refractive Surgery

LASIK

WHAT IS LASIK?
LASIK (Laser-In-Situ Keratomileusis) is currently the most common type of laser vision correction procedure. It is an extremely safe and effective outpatient procedure that is suitable for low, moderate, and higher prescriptions. As a  result, LASIK is one of the most frequently performed elective healthcare procedures in North America today. At SoCal Eye, our state-of-the-art technology and expertise allows us to provide optimal individualization for each patient. With the diversity of laser procedures available, we can offer the best fit for almost any vision issue.

WHO QUALIFIES FOR LASIK?
If you lead an active lifestyle and are bothered by the inconvenience or appearance of glasses (and the risks of contact lenses), you may be a candidate for laser vision correction. Likewise, if allergies, dry eye, or other eye disorders make contact lenses too irritating to wear, laser vision correction may provide a safe, convenient alternative. LASIK can treat a very broad range of nearsightedness, astigmatism, and farsightedness in people who are at least 18 years old and in good general health, have no eye diseases, and have had no significant change in prescription over the past year.

See if you’re a LASIK candidate. Take our self-evaluation test!

ALL-LASER LASIK
In this procedure, the surface layer of corneal tissue is precisely formed into a flap by the femtosecond laser and folded back from its usual position. The laser then gently reshapes the surface, and the very thin flap is placed back in its original position, where it bonds naturally. The procedure takes us about five minutes. Most patients say they have no pain with LASIK, and often return to work the next day. LASIK can treat nearsightedness, farsightedness, and astigmatism. With monovision or blended vision correction, LASIK can also correct the need for reading glasses, caused by presbyopia.

WAVEFRONT TECHNOLOGY
Using WaveScan®-based digital technology, originally developed to reduce distortion in high-powered telescopes, we can now identify and measure eye imperfections that in the past were not measurable. The data is then analyzed by the surgeon and used to customize every procedure. For some patients, wavefront-guided surgery may be advantageous.